Introduction to the Study of International Law: Designed as an Aid in Teaching and in Historical Studies

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Sampson Low, Marston, Low & Searle, 1875 - 383 halaman
 

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Rank of ambassadorsceremonialtermination of their mission
94
Consuls Origin of the consular office Consuls of the middle ages
95
Functions of consuls Their jurisdiction out of Christendom Their privi leges and status Their privileges in nonChristian countries Who can serve as co...
96
Disputes in seventeenth century concerning ceremonies at
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What treaties are lawful?
98
Treaties made by a limited sovereign
99
Treaties procured by fraud falsehood or force not binding
100
Treaties to do an unlawful thing not binding
101
Kinds of treaties
102
Treaties of alliance
103
Treaties of confederation
104
Treaties of guaranty Guaranties of treaties Origin of guaranties to treaties
105
Other modes of confirming the faith of treaties Hostages Pledges
106
When do treaties begin to be binding?
107
Violation of treaties
108
Interpretation of treaties Repugnant clauses and conflicting treaties
109
Of war in general SECTION I Of
110
War and just war what? Who is to judge of its justice? Are nations bound to resort to arbitration? Ought an ally to judge?
111
Rightfulness of war For what may war be undertaken?
112
Defensive and offensive
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Measures for redress falling short of war 1 Embargo Hostile embargo 2 Retorsion 3 Reprisals Greek and Roman mediæval and modern usage as to re...
114
Commencement of war Declaration Greek and Roman practice Media val practice Modern Reasons for the modern usage
115
What notice of a state of war ought to be given?
116
Effects of war Nonintercourse with the enemy Licence to trade
117
Enemys property within a belligerent country
118
Have all in each hostile state a right to wage war?
119
Treatment of enemys property on land and sea compared
120
Forces employed in war especially on the sea Privateers
121
Evils of privateering Testimony to these evils Endeavours to stop it by treaty Declaration of Paris 1856 Attitude of the United States
122
Restrictions on privateering to prevent its evils
123
Laws and usages of war somewhat vague yet improving Causes of this
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159 The neutral may admit into his ports war vessels of the belligerents
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What neutrals may not do Cases doubtful or disputed 1 Transit
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2 Furnishing troops to belligerents
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co com 162 What may a neutrals subject do? 6
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Rights of neutrals Case of the Caroline
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Continued
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Declaration attached to the peace of Paris in 1856
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Neutral property in armed enemies vessels
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Contraband of
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What goods are contraband in the usage of nations?
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Results as to deciding what articles are contraband Occasional contraband
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Is it just and sanctioned by usage? Opinions in respect to
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Preemption English practice in cases of preemption
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Penalty for contraband at sea Treaty modifying the penalty
183
Of the Suspension and Close of War especially of Truce and Peace
184
Trade closed in peace but open in
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Blockade What places can be blockaded? Why is a breach of blockade unlawful? Validity of a blockade Paper or cabinet blockades un lawful
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Evidence of a blockade What is due notice? What is a discontinuance of a blockade
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Penalty for breach of blockade Duration of liability to penalty
188
Attempts to stretch the doctrine of blockade Prussian decree Berlin
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The right of search Its narrow limits Duty of submitting to it Treaties often regulate the right
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CHAPTER II
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Its justice considered
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Neutrals under belligerent convoy
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Search during peace to execute revenue laws
194
Search on suspicion of piracy
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Search of foreign vessels suspected of being slavers unauthorised
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But conceded by treaties between most of the European states Examples of such treaties
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Obligations of the United States in regard to the slave trade Resolutions of congress Feb 28 1823 Negotiations in England and convention of 1824 a...
198
Treaty of Washington in 1842 Practice under the treaty
199
What does the right of search mean? Doctrine held by the United States New discussion concerning the right in 1858 1859 New arrangements with G...
200
Nationality of vessels a legitimate matter for inquiry in peace
201
Right of search for her seamen claimed by Great Britain
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Defects of international law 1 Its uncertainty
203
Selection of works relating to international
339
INDEX
369
comononononos 1 2 A law of action for states as for individuals founded in justice
3
92d 6 Privileges of ambassadors family and train
7
Names given to this science Not the same as jus gentium
10
Obligation of states to aid justice outside of their own bounds
21
International law adopted by municipal
30

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Halaman 37 - In the discussions to which this interest has given rise and in the arrangements by which they may terminate the occasion has been judged proper for asserting, as a principle in which the rights and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers.
Halaman 302 - Parma, the colony or province of Louisiana, with the same extent that it now has in the hands of Spain, and that it had when France possessed it, and such as it should be after the treaties subsequently entered into between Spain and other States.
Halaman 211 - The neutral flag covers enemy's goods, with the exception of contraband of war; 3. Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under enemy's flag; 4. Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective — that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
Halaman 352 - ... part of any province or people, or in the service of, or for, or under, or in aid of any person or persons exercising or assuming to exercise the powers of government in or over any foreign country, colony, province, or part of any province or people...
Halaman 334 - Secondly, not to permit or suffer either belligerent to make use of its ports or waters as the. base of naval operations against the other, or for the purpose of the renewal or augmentation of military supplies or arms, or the recruitment of men. Thirdly, to exercise due diligence in its own ports and waters, and, as to all persons within its jurisdiction, to prevent any violation of the foregoing obligations and duties.
Halaman 216 - But there is nothing in our laws, or in the law of nations, that forbids our citizens from sending armed vessels, as well as munitions of war, to foreign ports for sale. It is a commercial adventure which no nation is bound to prohibit, and which only exposes the persons engaged in it to the penalty of confiscation.
Halaman 334 - ... carry on war against a Power with which it is at peace ; and also to use like diligence to prevent the departure from its jurisdiction of any vessel intended to cruise or carry on war as above, such vessel having been specially adapted, in whole or in part, within such jurisdiction, to warlike use.
Halaman 155 - Thou shalt not smite them: wouldest thou smite those whom thou hast taken captive with thy sword and with thy bow? set bread and water before them, that they may eat and drink, and go to their master.
Halaman 350 - An Act to regulate the conduct of Her Majesty's subjects during the existence of hostilities between foreign States with which Her Majesty is at peace.
Halaman 224 - ... as any other goods found therein, which by this treaty are to be esteemed free, neither may they be detained on pretence of their being as it were infected by the prohibited goods, much less shall they be confiscated, as lawful prize...

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